8 facts about American inequality

The American Dream has been defined many ways by writers of both poetic and prosaic bent, but its essentials tend to involve life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness (or property, depending on your source). Continue reading

Chevron greases local election with gusher of cash

When the Citizens United decision came down in 2010, many feared the Supreme Court had unleashed vast and unfettered campaign contributions from corporations bent on tightening their hammerlock on government and politics. Continue reading

Britain’s real promise to Israel: ‘Symbolic’ vote on Palestine

The text of the letter was short and precise, leaving no room for any misinterpretation in the “promise” made by Britain’s Foreign Secretary Arthur James Balfour to a powerful representative of the Jewish community in Britain, Lord Rothschild, on that fateful day of 2 November 1917. Continue reading

Hollow justice and courts of order in an age of government-sanctioned tyranny

Justice in America makes less sense with each passing day. Continue reading

Redefining imminent

The Merriam-Webster definition of imminent is: “ready to take place; especially: hanging threateningly over one’s head.” Continue reading

Uncanny parallels in character

I’m not one of those who scribble blunt little mustaches on pictures of politicians I dislike, but here I make some uncomfortable and I believe accurate observations comparing personality and character traits of a contemporary politician with one of history’s darkest figures. Continue reading

What is wrong with Gareth Porter—an interview

A few days ago, I came across a disturbing article on Buzzfeed. The headline read; “U.S. Journalist Regrets Attending Conspiracy Conference In Tehran.” According to Buzzfeed, Gareth Porter, a respected journalist and critic of the Jewish lobby and Israel, reported that he would have never have attended the “conference in Tehran if he had known the real views of his fellow attendees.” Continue reading

CFR analyst says travel ban wouldn’t keep Ebola from spreading to the US

According to a senior fellow for global health at the Council on Foreign Relations, Laurie Garrett, “Travel bans would [not] keep Ebola from spreading in the United States.” Continue reading

Kiev war crimes

Mounting evidence shows Kiev committed horrendous war crimes in southeastern Ukraine. Continue reading

My father was killed by a computer, says 7 year old Afghan child

Imal, a 7-year-old Afghan student in the 2nd grade, came to visit us in Kabul. Continue reading

The Berlin Wall, another Cold War myth

November 9 will mark the 25th anniversary of the tearing down of the Berlin Wall. The extravagant hoopla began months ago in Berlin. In the United States, we can expect all the Cold War clichés about The Free World vs. Communist Tyranny to be trotted out and the simple tale of how the wall came to be will be repeated: In 1961, the East Berlin communists built a wall to keep their oppressed citizens from escaping to West Berlin and freedom. Why? Because commies don’t like people to be free, to learn the “truth.” What other reason could there have been? Continue reading

Challenging corporate power in a not-for-profit world

Does changing the way we do business hold the key to creating a world where resources are shared more equitably and consumed within planetary limits? According to Professor Donnie Maclurcan of the Post Growth Institute, the answer is a definitive yes—but only if we can fully embrace a business model that doesn’t require profits to be distributed to shareholders, and works instead to reinvest revenues back into the company. Increasingly, socially and environmentally conscious entrepreneurs are adopting not-for-profit (NFP) business practices across the whole spectrum of traditionally for-profit sectors. Maclurcan, whose book ‘How on Earth’ co-authored with Jennifer Hinton is due out next year, firmly believes that the NFP model presents an alternative macroeconomic framework with the potential to revolutionise how we produce goods and services, and thereby pave the way for an ‘economics of enough.’ Continue reading

Pennsylvania’s politics of virtue

The Pennsylvania Senate, possibly for the first time in its history, stood up against the NRA leadership and extreme gun-rights groups, and voted to ban pigeon shoots. The senators correctly called the ban a matter not of gun rights but of eliminating animal cruelty. Continue reading

America is lost with no moral compass

For all you out there reading this who already reject our current ‘Two Party, One Party’ political con job and understand that our nation is a Military Industrial Empire, the title above is not about YOU. However, this small (too small) group of us still has many friends and loved ones who are lost with no moral compass. We have associates, acquaintances , employers, coworkers and people we run into at the store or gas station who not only have no moral compass, but many are passionate defenders of this empire. The Why to this is most interesting and frightening. Continue reading

Stop the killing

On August 9, 1983, three people dressed as U.S. soldiers saluted their way onto a U.S. military base and climbed a pine tree. The base contained a school training elite Salvadoran and other foreign troops to serve dictatorships back home, with a record of nightmarish brutality following graduation. That night, once the base’s lights went out, the students of this school heard, coming down from on high, the voice of Archbishop Oscar Romero. Continue reading

Capitalism and the Ebola epidemic

Ebola was identified 40 years ago in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, then called Zaire. Two hundred and eighty people died in this first reported outbreak, out of 318 infected, for a fatality rate of 88 percent. Continue reading

Reinvented scoundrel media history

New York Times editors do it numerous ways. At times in their “Room for Debate” series. Featuring mostly one-sided views. Continue reading

Why President Rouhani’s ‘economic package’ is empty

Tired of the oppressive financial hardship, wrought largely by the imperialist economic war against Iran, the Iranian people elected Hassan Rouhani president (June 2013) as he promised economic revival. Continue reading

A changing Israel-Palestine global dynamic

Pro-Palestinian sympathies are on the rise. Due to the prevalence of social media, mainstream news outlets can no longer control the message. Ordinary folk around the world were incensed by the horrors inflicted upon the residents of the Gaza Strip by the Israeli army, seen graphically in videos posted on YouTube and many rounded on the corporate media for seeking to frame the conflict as one waged between equals. Continue reading

Two millstones drowning America into premature oblivion

It was over four decades ago that I first heard the expression “premature oblivion.” It came from a fellow graduate student at UCLA, Stefan, a magisterial peer to many of us, not so much because of his then-soon-to-be ABD status, but rather his Zorba the Greek likeability in his contrarian demeanor. Beyond obstinacy perhaps, most of us close to him would agree, but with an undeniable air of prophetic clairvoyance. And if we took his assertions as Stefan-lite dictums; as the years have gone by, some of us started to realize our misdiagnosed pig-headedness in him was no more than unbending firmness resulting from clear vision, historical knowledge and logical perspective. Continue reading

Why you can’t believe what you’re being told about ISIS

You can’t believe a word the United States or its mainstream media say about the current conflict involving The Islamic State (ISIS). Continue reading

Dark times: What to do

Professor Noam Chomsky has written an essay entitled, “The End of History: The short, strange era of human civilization would appear to be drawing to a close.” Chomsky invokes the Roman goddess Minerva as she contemplates the end drawing nigh. His essay is thoughtful. It is eloquent. But something is missing. Continue reading

The great unhinging

Summers uses jargon familiar to those who make financial policy, teach at Harvard, and are in process of destroying more of the earth and its people for short-term private profits that guarantee long-term public loss. Continue reading

CIA big guns still aiming for Rousseff prior to second-round election

(WMR)—After the corporate media and the CIA and George Soros manipulators tried to engineer Green Party-turned-Brazilian Socialist presidential candidate Marina Silva into the Brazilian presidency after the classic CIA textbook aerial assassination of Socialist Party presidential standard bearer Eduardo Campos, these same forces are at it again on behalf of Social Democratic Party candidate Aecio Neves. Neves finished second ahead of Silva, who came in third, in the first-round of the Brazilian presidential election that has seen the CIA, Soros, and the other agents of Wall Street try every trick in the book to ensure that President Dilma Rousseff fails to win a second term. Continue reading

Postcard from the end of America: New Orleans

This time, I got to New Orleans on a bus named Mega, and it also dropped me off at Elysian Fields. In Nola, there’s a street called Arts, so of course there has to be one named Desire, and Tennessee Williams clearly saw the two as intertwined, thrusting and plunging their bodies against each other. Of course, death will interrupt this coupling not just finally but every step of the way. Continue reading

‘Kill the Messenger’

What happens to people, ordinary citizens in positions to know and journalists, who report and publicize criminal acts committed by agencies in our government? Continue reading

The missing context: ‘Islamic State’ sectarianism is not coincidental

Consider this comical scene described by Peter Van Buren, a former US diplomat, who was deployed to Iraq on a 12-month assignment in 2009-10. Continue reading

Freedom Rider: Privatized Ebola

Sierra Leone has waved the white flag in the face of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD). Its meager infrastructure has buckled under the onslaught of a disease which could have been curtailed. The announcement that infected patients will be treated at home because there is no longer the capacity to treat them in hospitals is a surrender which did not have to happen. Not only did Europe and the United States turn a blind eye to sick and dying Africans but they did so with the help of an unlikely perpetrator. Continue reading

Mass surveillance destroys freedom

It’s longstanding. It’s institutionalized. It’s lawless. It has nothing to do with domestic or foreign threats. Or anything related to national security. Continue reading

Shielded from justice: The high cost of living in a police state

Who pays the price for the police shootings that leave unarmed citizens dead or injured, for the SWAT team raids that leave doors splintered, homes trashed, pets murdered, and family members traumatized and injured, if not dead? Continue reading

IS and the IDF: Canada’s double standard

Why can Westerners join the IDF while Westerners joining IS are despised and killed? In what sense is the IDF scenario any less reprehensible than the IS one? Continue reading

It’s time for a post-Piketty vision of shared wealth

There is no doubt that Thomas Piketty’s best-seller, Capital in the Twenty-First Century, has done a great deal of good in highlighting the urgency of tackling spiralling levels of global inequality. But could his main policy prescription—an annual global tax on capital—lead to a genuine sharing of wealth within and across societies? Continue reading