Pennsylvania school is flushed by a problem

Ten-year-old Kaitlyn Montgomery, a fourth grade student at Park Elementary School in Munhall, Pa., now has access to that school’s restrooms. Continue reading

Sing another song

Here in Lexington federal prison’s Atwood Hall, squinting through the front doorway, I spotted a rust-red horse swiftly cantering across a nearby field. The setting sun cast a glow across the grasses and trees as the horse sped past. “Reminds me of the pope,” I murmured to no one in particular. “What’s that?” Tiza asked. I tried to explain that once, when I asked a close friend his opinion of the pope, shortly after Catholic bishops had elected Pope Francis, my friend had said, “The horse is out of the stable! And galloping.” Continue reading

Islamic State is the cancer of modern capitalism

Debate about the origins of the Islamic State (IS) has largely oscillated between two extreme perspectives. One blames the West. IS is nothing more than a predictable reaction to the occupation of Iraq, yet another result of Western foreign policy blowback. The other attributes IS’s emergence purely to the historic or cultural barbarism of the Muslim world, whose backward medieval beliefs and values are a natural incubator for such violent extremism. Continue reading

How Ohio’s energy economy became a radioactive 19th century relic

Back in early 2010, Ohio stood at the cusp of a modern 21st century technological revolution. Continue reading

Britain prepares for nonexistent Russian attack

Britain is run by the same kinds of lunatics infesting America. Prime Minister David Cameron and other UK officials hype nonexistent “Russian aggression.” Continue reading

Urgent ‘musts’ needed for Palestinians to defeat apartheid

Waiting on Israeli society to change from within is a colossal waste of time, during which the suffering of an entire nation—torn between an occupied home and a harsh diaspora—will not cease. But what are Palestinians and the supporters of a just peace in Palestine and Israel to do? Plenty. Continue reading

Jesus died in a police state

If you buy into the version of Christianity Lite peddled by evangelical leaders such as Franklin Graham, who recently advised Americans to do as the Bible says and “submit to your leaders and those in authority,” then staying alive in the American police state depends largely on your ability to comply, submit, obey orders, respect authority and generally do whatever a cop tells you to do. Continue reading

Yemen’s collapse is a taste of things to come

Yemen is on the brink of civil war. The collapse of the US-backed government in the 2,500-year-old capital city, Sanaa, and the takeover by Shiite Houthi rebels from the north, has left the country in turmoil, amidst the threat of yet another regional conflagration along sectarian lines. Continue reading

Britain’s foreign secretary matches Kerry’s bullying, bluster and big lies

America and Britain partner in each other’s high crimes. Their longstanding relationship dates from the 19th century. Continue reading

The social costs of capitalism are destroying earth’s ability to support life

I admire David Ray Griffin for his wide-ranging intelligence, his research skills, and for his courage. Dr. Griffin is not afraid to take on the controversial topics. He gave us ten books on 9/11, and anyone who has read half of one of them knows that the official story is a lie. Continue reading

It’s all right, Ma, . . . I’m only bleeding!

Just watched Alex Gibney’s new documentary on Scientology, “Going Clear.” Continue reading

Leaked doc proves what we’ve been saying for years: TSA is nuts

Everyone’s been sending me the article from First Look/The Intercept about the latest “confidential” TSA document. Continue reading

The myth of capitalism and privatization

Growing up in The Bronx, the myth of capitalism and privatization was drummed into me. Publicly managed and controlled business operations were wasteful and, often, corrupt. It was the profit motive that made the private businesses efficient and profitable. If you want the job done right, you privatize. Continue reading

CIA document: U.S. split the Iraqi Kurds by backing right-wing faction

The Central Intelligence Agency was no less two-faced in 1975 than it is 40 years later in being on more than one side in Middle East strife brought about largely as a result of CIA subterfuge. Today, the U.S. military is coordinating its attacks on Islamic State forces in Iraq with Iranian ground forces in the country, who are defending the Shi’a Iraqis and Kurds, while, at the same time, the U.S. is providing logistical and intelligence assistance to a Saudi-led coalition, which includes Islamic State and Al Qaeda forces, fighting against Iranian-backed Houthi rebels who seized control of the country from a U.S. puppet regime whose president fled to Saudi Arabia. Continue reading

Arabs in a ‘decisive’ mood

Arab League summits used to be dismissed as little more than talking shops, mere forums for Arab leaders to stay in touch. Final communiqués were usually devoid of actionable steps to resolve issues. However, those criticisms are old news as the mood and outcome of the 26th summit held in Sharm El-Sheikh strongly indicates. Continue reading

Keep licking the icing and you’ll never eat the cake

Americans love to be diverted. Continue reading

Postcard from the end of America: Carlisle, Pennsylvania

Invited to give a reading at Dickinson College, I came to Carlisle, a town of 19,000 people 30 miles from Harrisburg. Arriving by train, I passed Amish country and saw plows being pulled by horses. On extremely long clotheslines, single-colored clothes fluttered in the wintry wind. Rising high and lithographed against the pale sky, they resembled subdued prayer flags. A white bearded man under a straw hat waved. Lancaster, Elizabethtown, Middletown. Had I sat on the opposite side, I would have been browbeaten by the looming nuclear reactors of Three Miles Island. Continue reading

The long Ides of March of Aldo Moro

“Beware the Ides of March”—or even the day after. On the morning of 16 March 1978 in Rome’s central via Fani, the Red Brigades (BR) kidnapped Italian Prime Minister Aldo Moro, head of the Christian Democratic Party (DC), killing five agents of his entourage. The fifty-five days of his detention in a secret “people’s prison” and eventual assassination by his captors on 9 May 1978 marked the climax of over thirty years of internal and external opposition to post-fascist Italy’s chartering its own political and economic course by “parallel convergences.” It is worth revisiting this long and twisted story as an early template for the bad faith with which the US Empire deals with the world today. It is not a story for conspiracy-phobes. Continue reading

The Kent State massacre 45 years later: Where is justice?

This article is dedicated to those who were killed and injured at Kent State and Jackson State in May 1970. Continue reading

Lithuanians under police state attack and the world under Washington’s attack

According to news reports and to this appeal by Kristoferis Voishka the pro-American government installed in Lithuania is persecuting Lithuanians who dissent from the anti-Russian propaganda that is driving Washington’s NATO puppets to war with Russia. Continue reading

36 years of Three Mile Island’s lethal lies . . . and still counting

The lies that killed people at Three Mile Island 36 years ago on March 28, 1979 are still being told at Chernobyl, Fukushima, Diablo Canyon, Davis-Besse . . . and at TMI itself. Continue reading

An American neo-Orientalist in Tehran

Sadly, Orientalism has not yet run its course. On the contrary, it has assumed different forms and has gained momentum in recent years. Continue reading

A conversation with CIA whistleblower John Kiriakou

John Kiriakou is widely known as the former CIA case officer who, in an interview with ABC News in late 2007, confirmed that the CIA had tortured prisoner Abu Zubaydah, an alleged member of al Qaeda, on the waterboard. Continue reading

How the US government and US military became Murder, Inc.

Andrew Cockburn has written a must-read book. The title is Kill Chain: The Rise of the High-Tech Assassins. The title could just as well be: How the US Government and US Military Became Murder, Inc. Continue reading

The only truly compliant, submissive citizen in a police state is a dead one

Americans as young as 4 years old are being leg shackled, handcuffed, Tasered and held at gunpoint for not being quiet, not being orderly and just being childlike—i.e., not being compliant enough. Continue reading

Freedom Rider: Uncle Tom celebrities

Does the entertainment industry have an Uncle Tom clause for black performers? That certainly seems to be the case, with endless jaw dropping comments uttered by famous black people recently. One may call himself “new black,” another doesn’t mind being called “nigger,” and another says the end of racism depends upon black people showing love to white people. Continue reading

Andreas Lubitz: The Adam Lanza of air travel

Who knows what lurks beneath a smile, an answer to an inquiry about one’s day, or the voice of a pilot who might announce, “We’re at cruising altitude. You can unbuckle your seatbelt and move around the cabin”? Continue reading

New age of water wars portends ‘bleak future’

Behind the escalating violence in Iraq, Syria and Yemen, as well as the epidemic of civil unrest across the wider region, is a growing shortage of water. Continue reading

California water wars: Another form of asset stripping?

Wars over California’s limited water supply have been going on for at least a century. Water wars have been the subject of some vintage movies, including the 1958 hit The Big Country starring Gregory Peck, Clint Eastwood’s 1985 Pale Rider, 1995’s Waterworld with Kevin Costner, and the 2005 film Batman Begins. Most acclaimed was the 1975 Academy Award winner Chinatown with Jack Nicholson and Faye Dunaway, involving a plot between a corrupt Los Angeles politician and land speculators to fabricate the 1937 drought in order to force farmers to sell their land at low prices. The plot was rooted in historical fact, reflecting battles between Owens Valley farmers and Los Angeles urbanites over water rights. Continue reading

Something in the USA has to work right: A non-profit hospital in Virginia actually does

It is easy to severely criticize the state of many things in the United States of America: the US president and Congress bowing to the demands of the national security community to exempt their $1 trillion (US) spending from sequestration mandates. The demise of Detroit, Michigan, and another round of water shut-offs scheduled for April that will affect nearly 100,000 residents (the Detroit bankruptcy case judge’s ruled that residents have no inherent right to clean water). The geopolitical brinkmanship with Russia and China that, if pushed too far, could lead to World War III. The odious double standards applied to “leakers” of classified military and intelligence information js repulsive: former US Army general and CIA director David Petraeus gets no jail time for passing off military secrets to his lover Paula Broadwell, yet former CIA analyst John Kiriakou gets two years in federal prison. Continue reading

Netanyahu’s ‘us or them’ is nothing but trouble

For a long time now, American political consultants have benefited from a lucrative sideline, selling their alleged expertise to politicians in Israel. (It was Democratic strategist James Carville who, after working on a campaign for former Prime Minister Ehud Barak, joked that the key to victory in Israel was who won “that all-important Jewish vote.”) Continue reading

Netanyahu the mythbuster: ‘Special relationship’ no more

Imagine if an American presidential candidate made a plea to his supporters on election day with the following statement: “The Republican administration is in danger. Black voters are going en masse to the polls. Liberal NGOs are bringing them on buses.” Continue reading