Why women don’t report sexual assault

Delays should never be used to discredit accusers like Christine Blasey Ford.

When Christine Blasey Ford came forward to report that President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, Brett Kavanaugh, sexually assaulted her in 1982, you could cue the response: Why didn’t she speak out then? Why didn’t she go to the police?

There’s a long, long list of reasons why a woman wouldn’t speak out even now, and no doubt it was even more difficult in the pre-Anita Hill world of 1982.

I can’t speak for everyone who has faced sexual assault, but I can speak for myself.

1. At first, I didn’t know that what happened to me was a crime. My first assault occurred in college, 18 years ago. He lived in my dorm. I knew what rape was and didn’t think I’d experienced that. But I didn’t know that sexual violations without consent that aren’t sexual intercourse are also a crime.

2. I couldn’t talk about it. Even now, I can’t describe what happened to my therapist in any detail. What happened involved body parts that are too private to discuss with those closest to me—let alone the police, a judge, or a newspaper. Talking about a past trauma can be re-traumatizing. Some of us cope by staying silent.

3. I blamed myself. I physically resisted for a while and then I froze and it happened. At the time, I told myself that if I really didn’t want it, I would’ve kept fighting. I didn’t know that freezing is a normal human response in a traumatic situation.

4. Afterward, I wanted him to be my boyfriend. My therapist said this was my way of trying to improve the situation. If he was my boyfriend, then what happened could be reinterpreted as meaningful. It’s a perverse response, but it’s apparently not uncommon.

5. I know someone who reported a rape to the police and had a traumatic experience of testifying in court and getting cross-examined by her rapist’s lawyer in front of her rapist. And then the rapist was found innocent. I don’t want that to happen to me.

6. Now, 18 years later, the man who assaulted me is an instructor of neurology at a prominent children’s hospital. He did a terrible thing to me, once, nearly two decades ago. Should I attempt to ruin his career because of it?

The answer to that is: I don’t know. If I thought he was still assaulting women and my speaking out would contribute to making him stop, I would in a heartbeat.

What he did to me 18 years ago still hurts so much that I would only revisit that assault and expose him publicly if there was a very clear purpose to doing so.

I expect if I did attempt to expose him, I’d be attacked. People would say that it wasn’t an assault because I wanted him to be my boyfriend afterward. They would say I wanted it because I froze and stopped fighting. There are good odds I wouldn’t be believed.

I’ll tell you this: Like Christine Blasey Ford, if the man who assaulted me was nominated for the U.S. Supreme Court, I’d speak up. I don’t think a man who violates a woman that way is qualified to rule on cases of violence against women, or any other aspect of their well-being. I don’t think he could be impartial.

When a victim of sexual crimes comes forward, even if it’s decades after the crime took place, we shouldn’t use her past silence against her as “evidence” to discredit her. That urge to discredit is exactly why it takes so long for some to come forward in the first place.

OtherWords columnist Jill Richardson writes about food, agriculture, the environment, health, tolerance, and well-being. Currently pursuing a PhD in Sociology at University of Wisconsin-Madison, she’s the author of “Recipe for America: Why Our Food System is Broken and What We Can Do to Fix It.” Distributed by OtherWords.org.

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5 Responses to Why women don’t report sexual assault

  1. It has been reported that two of the “witnesses” named by Ms. Ford have denied any knowledge of an assault. These bourgeois “feminists” have made themselves utterly ridiculous with their boundless mendacity and willingness to abandon due process of law. As our Constitution continues to be assaulted and raped, these hysterical witch hunts keep us distracted and fighting one another.

  2. Hatch, Corker, Flake et al, (TRump too since he is not calling for the FBI the investigate/clear/truth tell the story) are all part of the same good ole-boys club that Kavanaugh and his friends including this Dan McGahn are part of. Since they do not really want the truth to come out and are doing all in their power to keep it from coming out they are emotionally holding Professor Ford to and on the same bed that Kavanaugh and his buddy held her to years ago and are placing on her the same hands multiplied by many that Kavanaugh placed on her to keep her from screaming/calling for help.

  3. I want to to thank you for this great read!!
    I certainly enjoyed every bit of it. I’ve got you saved
    as a favorite to check out new stuff you post.

  4. I would like to remind social justice warriors that are presently joining forces with the intelligence agencies and armaments industries in their effort to bring down Trump by any and all means at hand that such a move can come around and bite them on the butt. Consider the fate of “left” Democrats and labor unions that took part in the red scare hysteria of the fifties. It was the beginning of the end for them.