Author Archives: Thomas L. Knapp

A US war on Iran would be evil, stupid, and self-damaging

“If Iran wants to fight,” US president Donald Trump tweeted on May 19, “that will be the official end of Iran. Never threaten the United States again.” Continue reading

Trump’s ‘trade war’ is a war on you

“It’s not China that pays tariffs,” Fox News Sunday host Chris Wallace pointed out on May 12. “It’s the American importers, the American companies that pay what, in effect, is a tax increase and oftentimes passes it on to U.S. consumers.” Continue reading

Big Government and Big Tech versus the Internet and everyone

Governments around the world began trying to bring the Internet under control as soon as they realized the danger to their power represented by unfettered public access to, and exchange of, information. From attempts to suppress strong encryption technology to the Communications Decency Act in the US and China’s “Great Firewall,” such efforts have generally proven ineffectual. But things are changing, and not for the better. Continue reading

Social media regulation: Speak of the Devil and in walks Zuck

In a recent column on the mating dance between Big Government and Big Tech, I noted that “Big Tech wants to be regulated by Big Governments because regulation makes it more difficult and expensive for new competitors to enter the market.” Continue reading

Note to six senators: ‘Present’ is not presidential

On February 7, US Senator Ed Markey (D-MA) and US Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) released the text of a joint resolution calling for a “Green New Deal.” Continue reading

Florida: Why Republican lawmakers are defying—and denying—the voters

In Florida’s November 2018 election, voters approved the following amendment to their state’s constitution: “Except as provided in subsection (b) of this section, any disqualification from voting arising from a felony conviction shall terminate and voting rights shall be restored upon completion of all terms of sentence including parole or probation. (b) No person convicted of murder or a felony sexual offense shall be qualified to vote until restoration of civil rights.” Continue reading

Suppressing discussion doesn’t solve the problem; it is the problem

Everywhere one looks these days, the world seems to be moving away from debate on contentious subjects and toward demands that those who have unpopular opinions—or even just ask impertinent questions—be forcibly silenced. Continue reading

Social media companies ‘struggle’ to help censors keep us in the dark

According to CNN Business, “Facebook, YouTube and Twitter struggle to deal with New Zealand shooting video.” Continue reading

Mueller report: Secrecy shouldn’t be an option

As February draws to an end, rumors abound that we’re about to see Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report on alleged Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election. Or at least that someone—namely, newly confirmed US Attorney General William Barr — is about to see that report. The rest of us, maybe not so much. Continue reading

The real emergency isn’t about the wall, it’s about the separation of powers

US president Donald Trump recently declared a “national emergency” under which he intends to divert money from the US Department of Defense’s budget and use it to build a wall on the US-Mexico border Continue reading

The first rule of AIPAC is: You do not talk about AIPAC

Washington’s political establishment went berserk when US Representative Ilhan Omar (D-MN) publicly noted that US-Israel relations are “all about the Benjamins”—slang for $100 bills, referring to money shoveled at American politicians by the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC). Continue reading

‘No-knock raid’ is just another term for ‘violent home invasion’

On January 28, home invaders murdered 58-year-old Rhogena Nicholas and 59-year-old Dennis Tuttle of Houston, Texas. Nicholas and Tuttle wounded five of the (numerous) armed burglars before being slain. Continue reading

Venezuela: None of our business

On January 23, the President of Venezuela’s National Assembly, Juan Guaido, was sworn in as “interim president.” In what was presumably a pre-coordinated move, Guaido’s administration was quickly recognized by the governments of the United States, Canada, and several countries in Latin America. Continue reading

‘Papers, please’ is un-American

When police in Corinth, Texas, stopped Dorothy Bland to caution her against walking on the right side of the street (she was out to get some exercise with a “power walk”), Bland—a former newspaper editor and current dean of the University of Texas’s Mayborn School of Journalism—felt that she had been racially profiled and said so from the bully pulpit of a column for the Dallas Morning News. Continue reading