Author Archives: Thomas L. Knapp

I watched ‘Cuties’ so you wouldn’t have to (but you should)

A brigade of pearl-clutching, virtue-signaling, cancel-culture keyboard warriors wants you to know that Cuties (Mignonnes—it’s actually a French film) is a bad, bad movie that no one should watch and that Netflix should immediately remove from its lineup. Continue reading

Silence is not consent in politics, either

When you undergo a medical procedure or volunteer for a research study, you’re presented with forms to sign, outlining what’s going to happen (and what bad things could happen), and expressly consenting to have those things happen. Continue reading

Nick Sandmann: GOP’s poster child for fake victimhood

A common complaint among Republicans is that their opponents are mainly in the business of manufacturing victims and turning those victims into Democratic voters. Continue reading

America doesn’t have presidential debates, but it should

On August 6, the Commission on Presidential Debates denied US president Donald Trump’s request to increase the number of debates between himself and Democratic nominee Joe Biden from three to four. Continue reading

Ten years after Lieberman’s “Internet Kill Switch,” the war on freedom rages on

In 2010, US Senators Joe Lieberman (D-CT), Susan Collins (R-ME), and Thomas Carper (D-DE) introduced their Protecting Cyberspace as a National Asset Act. Better known as the “Internet Kill Switch” proposal for the emergency powers it would have conferred on the president, the bill died without receiving a vote in either house of Congress. Continue reading

A modest proposal for compromise on Confederate military bases

In July 1864, Confederate forces led by General Jubal Early attacked Fort Stevens and Fort DeRussy on the outskirts of Washington, DC. Union forces drove them away after two days of skirmishes, but the battle threw a scare into the capital city and constituted a high point in the Confederacy’s Shenandoah Valley campaigns. Continue reading

This is the most important presidential election since the last presidential election

Every four years without fail (and usually a little earlier in each quadrennial cycle), both “major” American political parties wind up and toss the same slow, fat pitch across the public’s plate: This is the most important presidential election of our lifetimes. Continue reading

The banality of evil, COVID-19 edition

As the COVID-19 pandemic ran its deadly course in New York, Governor Andrew Cuomo affirmed a state policy forbidding nursing homes to reject patients suffering from the disease. Continue reading

Republicans can’t seem to make up their minds about mail and voting

One laudable side effect of the COVID-19 panic is a nationwide effort to promote “vote by mail” as a universal alternative to standing in line at polling places. One reason that effort is laudable is that it would likely decrease vote fraud. Continue reading

Who was behind the incompetent Venezuela ‘invasion?’

On May 3, a group of around 60 mercenaries attempted an amphibious landing at Macuto, on Venezuela’s Caribbean coast. They were quickly defeated and 13 of them—including two Americans, Airan Berry and Luke Denman—captured. Continue reading

A proposal for real coronavirus ‘stimulus’

On March 12, the New York Federal Reserve announced a $1.5 trillion injection of money into the US financial system. Three days later, it cut its benchmark interest rate to zero and announced it would be buying at least $500 billion in government bonds and another $200 billion in mortgage securities. Continue reading

Paul Krugman, COVID-19, and ‘Broken Windows’

The jury is still out on which of two things—COVID-19 or the panic over COVID-19—will cost more lives and do more damage to the global economy. My money’s still on the latter. In the meantime, I’ve developed a surefire, Groundhog Day type test for whether the emergency is over. Continue reading

Freedom: Don’t let politicians tell you to EARN IT

The Wile E. Coyotes of the Internet—US Senators Lindsey Graham (R-SC) and Richard Blumenthal (D-CT)—are sure that THIS time they’ve finally found a made-to-order tool that can take out the Roadrunn … er, those meddling ki … er, the First Amendment and Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act. Continue reading

Executive Power: Alan Dershowitz’s imagination versus the Constitution

“The Constitution,” Alan Dershowitz claims, “allocates to the president sole authority over foreign policy (short of declaring war or signing a treaty).” Continue reading

The Soleimani assassination: Worse than a crime, a mistake

In March of 1804, French dragoons secretly crossed the Rhine into the German Margraviate of Baden. Acting on orders from Napoleon himself, they kidnapped Louis Antoine de Bourbon, Duke of Enghien. After a hastily convened court-martial on charges of bearing arms against France, the duke was shot. Continue reading

Afghanistan: Oh, when will we ever learn?

“U.S. officials failed to tell the truth about the war in Afghanistan throughout the 18-year campaign,” the Washington Post‘s Craig Whitlock reports, “making rosy pronouncements they knew to be false and hiding unmistakable evidence the war had become unwinnable.” Continue reading

JEDI mind tricks: Amazon versus the Pentagon and Trump

Amazon is one of the largest companies in the world, boasting revenues of more than $230 billion last year. But last month the company sued the US Department of Defense over a paltry potential $10 billion spread over ten years. Continue reading

Thankful in 2019

A political writer’s annual Thanksgiving column can be easy to write, or incredibly difficult to put together. It can also be inspiring or banal. The two are probably connected. It’s always a difficult one for me; its quality is a matter of your opinion. But hey, today is Turkey Day and it’s time to talk about being thankful. Please bear with. Continue reading

Explainer: No, House Democrats aren’t violating Trump’s rights

“If the facts are your side,” famed attorney and former law professor Alan Dershowitz instructed his students, “pound the facts into the table. If the law is on your side, pound the law into the table. If neither the facts nor the law are on your side, pound the table.” Continue reading

Mexico: One failed US war doesn’t justify another

On November 4, ten dual US-Mexican citizens—members of an offshoot sect of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints — died in a highway ambush, apparently the latest casualties of rampant and violent drug cartel activity in northern Mexico. Continue reading

On Twitter, some animals are more equal than others

“There continues to be meaningful public conversation about how we think about Tweets from world leaders on our service,” begins a post at the micro-blogging service’s non-micro-blog. Continue reading

‘The Grid’ is the problem, not the solution

On October 9, Pacific Gas & Electric began shutting down power to about 750,000 customers (affecting as many as 2 million people) in California. The company claims the shutdowns are necessary to reduce the risk that its power lines and other infrastructure will cause wildfires like last year’s Camp Fire, which killed 85 people and caused $16.5 billion in damage. Continue reading

Entangling alliances make for forever wars

In March of 2018, US president Donald Trump promised “we’ll be coming out of Syria, like, very soon.” That December, he issued an order to begin withdrawing US troops. Apparently, the order never got executed. Most of a year later, US forces remain. Continue reading

Impeachment is on rails. That’s not the hard part

On September 24, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) elbowed her way to the front of a parade she’d been trying to disperse since early 2017. “Today ,” she said, “I’m announcing the House of Representatives is moving forward with an official impeachment inquiry and directing our six committees to proceed with their investigation under that umbrella of impeachment inquiry.” Continue reading

Yep, these people are stone cold crooked

Did Vice President Joe Biden threaten to withhold $1 billion in US loan guarantees from the Obama administration if the Ukrainian government failed to remove a prosecutor whose investigation targets included Burisma Holdings, a gas company on whose board Biden’s son, Hunter, sat? Yes. He’s publicly admitted it. Continue reading

Sneering at ‘conspiracy theories’ is a lazy substitute for seeking the truth

On the morning of August 10, a wealthy sex crimes defendant was reportedly found dead in his cell at New York’s Metropolitan Correctional Center. Continue reading

Reading is fundamental, Congress should try it

As the US House of Representatives took up the Affordable Care Act, aka “ObamaCare,” in 2010, then Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) famously told her fellow members of Congress “we have to pass the bill so that you can find out what is in it.” Continue reading

Don’t let mass shooters and the New York Times destroy freedom of speech

“Online communities like 4chan and 8chan have become hotbeds of white nationalist activity,” wrote the editors of the New York Times on August 4 in the wake of a mass shooting in El Paso, Texas. Then: “Law enforcement currently offers few answers as to how to contain these communities.” Continue reading

Afghanistan: In search of monsters to not destroy

America, John Quincy Adams said in 1821, “goes not abroad, in search of monsters to destroy. She is the well-wisher to the freedom and independence of all. She is the champion and vindicator only of her own.” That’s as good a summary ever spoken of the non-interventionist position. Continue reading

American politicians use Jews as pawns to excuse their meddling in Israeli elections

On July 23, the US House of Representatives passed (the vote went 398-17, with five voting “present”) a resolution condemning the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) Movement. Continue reading

National polls don’t mean much. Here’s why.

“Here we go with the Fake Polls,” President Donald Trump tweeted on July 15. “Just like what happened with the Election against Crooked Hillary Clinton.” He’s complaining about several polls that show him losing the national popular vote to various Democratic presidential aspirants, in some cases by double digits. Continue reading

Free speech just isn’t that complicated

It’s hard to believe we need to have this conversation in this day and age. But if we don’t keep having it, at some point we might not be allowed to have it. Continue reading